Using icurio to find Learning Resource Types to Target Specific Learning Opportunities

icurio’s resources are tagged and contextualized by a team of highly qualified educators with extensive experience around digital learning and educational content. Every resource found in icurio goes through a 127-point certification process that includes resource contextualization by using Learning Resource Type (LRT) tags. LRTs help users target their results for the intent or essence of a resource, describing its primary intent.

Targeting a Set of Resources

Search for “Elements”: Results for Learning Resource Types 

Your result could contain a plethora of resources in a multitude of types: videos, learning games, assessments, etc.

So, how do you target these results for the types of learning resources and opportunities for your learners? Opening the menus on the left frame of the results window gives you available Learning Resource Types for that particular set of resources.

Varying Types of Resources within a LRT

 

 

 

 

Some LRTs represent a single kind of resource, for example Video. On the other hand, some LRTs are intended to identify a set of common characteristics, such as Visual Material or Learning Module.

Have you thought about all the different types of resources that can be used in your lessons? Want to vary the type of assessment of learning? Looking to provide a resource that drives student learning via a game or interactive experience? Curate specifically for these pieces and bring the different types of resources together to help learners accomplish those objectives you are focusing on in your lesson.

Consider some of the most common Learning Resource Types below:

 

pic 3 L
“Angles” – Assessment

Assessment

A resource that provides a method of gauging a student’s understanding of a topic or concept is considered an assessment. Different types of assessments include:

  • Quiz
  • Rubric
  • Self-Assessment
  • Test
  • Worksheet

 

pic 4 S
“Angles” – Interactive Media 

Interactive Media

A resource that delivers interactive media-rich content such as: Flash, moving images, motion graphics, animations, etc. The Interactive Media LRT requires that the user be actively engaged in the resource in some way. These resources may contain conventional video and/or audio as well, but may not be exclusively composed of this media.

 

 

pic 5 S
“Angles” – Visual Material 

Visual Material

Resources that include little text, primarily relying on graphics, illustrations, or other visual elements as the primary source of content are considered visual materials. Different types of visual material types include: Artwork, Chart, Diagram, Map, Slideshow

 

 

There are many other Learning Resource Types that provide additional choices to target your results.  Check out others like: Whiteboard Resource, Learning Game, Test Preparation Material, and eBook. Remember that, depending on what you’re searching for, some results may show a variety of resources in different types. Also, depending on what you’re searching for, some results may not include certain kinds of Learning Resource Types (like Article for a search on Acute Triangles). Make sure you take advantage of the work our expert content team has done for you by utilizing the Learning Resource Types in icurio today!

 

 

Knovation Newsletter: Back to School – Using OER to Reach All Students

10483691-human-hands-with-pencil-and-erase-rubber-writing-back-to-school-Stock-Photo

Returning to a new school year is an exciting time for teachers. The new academic year is a fresh start for many educators and this includes both the joy of being back in the classroom and the new challenges to master. One of the challenges is finding the way through a new curriculum to support instruction and, in many cases, a digital learning focus in technology-rich classrooms. This can be an overwhelming task, but with access to the Knovation collection of educator-curated digital resources—via netTrekker or icurio—this challenge becomes a creative adventure.

Knovation’s Open Education Resources (OER) collection provide teachers with many unique learning opportunities that foster differentiation with a variety of resources on a particular topic, giving students choices and appealing to a wide range of learning styles.

One of these opportunities is the easy access to primary and secondary sources, which gives students a better understanding of historical perspectives and promotes literacy within the social studies subject area.

“My students could easily research primary and secondary sources to develop their claim and find supporting evidence when writing an argumentative paper on the justification of child labor. They found excellent resources such as Child Labor in America: 1908 – 1912: Investigative Photos of Lewis Hine , The Victorian Web: Child Labor, and International Labor Office: Child Labor (Video). I know that the OER collection from Knovation will provide quality, credible, and relevant resources every time! This way, my students will spend less time searching for good resources and will spend more time analyzing the information to develop arguments for their paper. “

8th Grade Social studies teacher

 

icurio May Newsletter – Summer Learning Can Be Fun!

summer-1

As the days grow warmer and the sun shines longer, schools often wind down their learning plans. But we all know that learning never stops. Kids may not be in the formal classroom setting, but their learning opportunities continue. So, instead of treating summer break like a break from learning, we can embrace opportunities that present themselves. There are plenty of ways to get creative about summer learning. Here are some ideas to help warm up to new learning during the summer months.

Summer Learning Tips for Parents: general tips for parents, highlighting the importance of keeping kids intellectually stimulated while also suggesting topics and activities to do during the summer months. It provides a quick summary of the research on sustaining academic activities and gives ideas on how to keep kids engaged.

Summer Reading Fun

One of the most popular summer learning activities is reading. Kids get the opportunity to engage with a variety of books and ideas that grab their interest. Competing with video games can be a challenge, but these Scholastic resources are up to meeting it. These resources provide solid strategies and outlets for age-appropriate, summer reading fun.

Summer Science Exploration

science 1

Just because school’s not formally “in session” doesn’t mean that fun science projects aren’t possible. Quite the contrary; whether you’re in the city, suburb or rural setting, kids have wonderfully creative outlets to “get their science on!” The increased hours of sunlight during the summer gives kids countless opportunities to get outside and explore. With great ideas for science experiments you can do at home, suggestions for exploring nature, interactive science history and geography games, and links to summer science camps, these resources provide great ideas for summer science exploration.

Summer Sun – Health and Safety

That summer sun can be super fun, but we need to ensure that we stay safe. We love to feel the warmth of the sun on our skin, but we all need to remember the importance of protection from too much sun exposure. These resources provide some nice health and safety tips for enjoying the summer sun.

 

May 2015: Summer Fun – Learning in the Sun!

Summer

As the days grow warmer and the sun shines longer, schools often wind down their learning plans. But we all know that learning never stops. Kids may not be in the formal classroom setting, but their learning opportunities continue. So, instead of treating summer break like a break from learning, we can embrace opportunities that present themselves. There are plenty of ways to get creative about summer learning. Here are some ideas to help warm up to new learning during the summer months.

Summer Learning Tips for Parents: general tips for parents, highlighting the importance of keeping kids intellectually stimulated while also suggesting topics and activities to do during the summer months. It provides a quick summary of the research on sustaining academic activities and gives ideas on how to keep kids engaged.

Summer Reading Fun

One of the most popular summer learning activities is reading. Kids get the opportunity to engage with a variety of books and ideas that grab their interest. Competing with video games can be a challenge, but these Scholastic resources are up to meeting it. These resources provide solid strategies and outlets for age-appropriate, summer reading fun.

Summer Science Exploration

science 2

Just because school’s not formally “in session” doesn’t mean that fun science projects aren’t possible. Quite the contrary; whether you’re in the city, suburb or rural setting, kids have wonderfully creative outlets to “get their science on!” The increased hours of sunlight during the summer gives kids countless opportunities to get outside and explore. With great ideas for science experiments you can do at home, suggestions for exploring nature, interactive science history and geography games, and links to summer science camps, these resources provide great ideas for summer science exploration.

Summer Sun – Health and Safety

That summer sun can be super fun, but we need to ensure that we stay safe. We love to feel the warmth of the sun on our skin, but we all need to remember the importance of protection from too much sun exposure. These resources provide some nice health and safety tips for enjoying the summer sun.

April 2015: Celebrate National Poetry Month!

National Poetry Month

You don’t have to be a language arts teacher to love April. After all, it is National Poetry Month – a whole month to celebrate the beauty, the emotion, the meaning that poetry adds to life. Poets write about all subjects, not just “English-y” ones, and that means that you can introduce poetry into science class, math class, social studies class, art, music, foreign language, even physical education. Shake your students up and start class each day during April with a poem. But don’t think you have to do all the work of finding or reading these poems. Once you get the month started, you’ll find that students are delighted to share poetry they have found.

Off to a Good Start

Poetry 180

netTrekker offers a broad spectrum of poetry to enjoy, and to begin with, former U.S. Poet Laureate Billy Collins offers a poem that suggests how we might approach poetry in classes across the curriculum in “Introduction to Poetry.” Then, to demonstrate to students that poetry is for everyone, use “Americans Saying Poems They Love.” For high school students the Library of Congress site begun by Billy Collins, “Poetry 180” is a great place to find poetry to share.

Some great general collections of poetry can be found at “The Children’s Poetry Archive” and “Josie’s Poems.”

Ideas across the Curriculum

Science teachers have plenty to choose from, as so many poets have written about the natural world. From “PBS: Poetry Everywhere“, you might choose to share Kay Ryan’s “Turtle,” Ted Kooser’s “Daddy Long Legs,” or Charles Simic’s “Stone.”

Two more interesting sources are Karen Glenn’s poem sampler, “Ten Poems to Get You Through Science Class This Year”,  with selections by William Carlos Williams, Christina Rosetti and others, and “30 Days of ‘Quantum Poetry’ Celebrating the Glory of Science”, which offers seven poems by British biologist and poet Joanna Tilsley.

In math class, you might share “Numbers”, by Mary Cornish, or “A Love Poem for Lonely Prime Numbers”, by Harry Baker.

Poetry about sports can help us see more than the play on the field, just as physical education teachers know that they are teaching more than just rules of a game. Poetry Foundation has several collections of sports poetry to share:

Find these resources and more in netTrekker with the keyword search: April Newsletter.

icurio 1.0 April Newsletter: Celebrating National Poetry Month Across the Curriculum

National Poetry Month

You don’t have to be a language arts teacher to love April. After all, it is National Poetry Month – a whole month to celebrate the beauty, the emotion, the meaning that poetry adds to life. Poets write about all subjects, not just “English-y” ones, and that means that you can introduce poetry into science class, math class, social studies class, art, music, foreign language, even physical education. Shake your students up and start class each day during April with a poem. But don’t think you have to do all the work of finding or reading these poems. Once you get the month started, you’ll find that students are delighted to share poetry they have found.

Off to a Good Start

Poetry 180

icurio offers a broad spectrum of poetry to enjoy, and to begin with, former U.S. Poet Laureate Billy Collins offers a poem that suggests how we might approach poetry in classes across the curriculum in “Introduction to Poetry.” Then, to demonstrate to students that poetry is for everyone, use “Americans Saying Poems They Love.” For high school students the Library of Congress site begun by Billy Collins, “Poetry 180” is a great place to find poetry to share.

Some great general collections of poetry can be found at “The Children’s Poetry Archive” and “Josie’s Poems.”

Ideas across the Curriculum

Science teachers have plenty to choose from, as so many poets have written about the natural world. From “PBS: Poetry Everywhere“, you might choose to share Kay Ryan’s “Turtle,” Ted Kooser’s “Daddy Long Legs,” or Charles Simic’s “Stone.”

Two more interesting sources are Karen Glenn’s poem sampler, “Ten Poems to Get You Through Science Class This Year”,  with selections by William Carlos Williams, Christina Rosetti and others, and “30 Days of ‘Quantum Poetry’ Celebrating the Glory of Science”, which offers seven poems by British biologist and poet Joanna Tilsley.

In math class, you might share “Numbers”, by Mary Cornish, or “A Love Poem for Lonely Prime Numbers”, by Harry Baker.

Poetry about sports can help us see more than the play on the field, just as physical education teachers know that they are teaching more than just rules of a game. Poetry Foundation has several collections of sports poetry to share:

Find these resources and more in icurio with the keyword search: April Newsletter

March 2015: Welcoming Spring!

Kites: More than a Fun Activity

Spring is here!

March 20, 2015, is the first day of Spring! The warmer weather brings many of us outdoors to enjoy the changing season after a long winter of snow and cold temperatures. For many, these activities include flying kites.

Kites are not only a fun activity to do outside but they can also provide a theme to learn and apply math, language arts, science, and social studies skills. This month we will explore several resources that teach students about different types of kites, why they fly, and how they have been used in history.

Elementary – Build, Listen and Learn

Interactive Resource: "The Insect Kite"
Interactive Resource: The Insect Kite
  • Make a Giant Insect Kite – This interactive resource gives step-by-step instructions on building a kite using the items many classrooms already have.
  • Days with Frog and Toad: The Kite – One of the “Frog and Toad” children’s stories written and illustrated by Arnold Lobel. In this story, Frog and his friend Toad spend the day together flying their kite and having lots of fun.
  • TeachEngineering: Will It Fly?– Your students can explore what makes a kite fly through this lesson plan. They will learn about the four forces that affect flight and variables involved in the engineering design of airplane models as they build their own balsa glider.

Middle – Physics and Electricity

PBS Teachers - Kite
Video: PBS Teachers – Kites
  • PBS Teachers: Kites – Danielle and Jasmin love to fly kites. Through this video, students will learn that kites come in all kinds of shapes and designs. They will enjoy watching Danielle and Jasmin prepare for a kite flying contest as they test a variety of kite styles to see how each will perform.

High – Math and History

Franklin's Electricity
Franklin’s Electricity
  • CK-12 Foundation: Geometry: Kites – Using geometry skills, students can explore why a kite is a quadrilateral, along with other properties of kites and how to apply them.
  • Engines of Our Ingenuity: Franklin’s Electricity – Some research puts Franklin’s electrical work in the scientific and political context of his day. An interesting point of view, one not usually found in comments of Franklin and electrostatics.

Find these resources and more in netTrekker with the keyword search: March Newsletter.

icurio 1.0 March Newsletter: Ready for the New Season!

Kites: So Much to Learn from Them!

Spring Kite

March 20, 2015, is the first day of Spring! The warmer weather brings many of us outdoors to enjoy the changing season after a long winter of snow and cold temperatures. For many, these activities include flying kites.

Kites are not only a fun activity to do outside but they can also provide a theme to learn and apply math, language arts, science, and social studies skills. This month we will explore several resources that teach students about different types of kites, why they fly, and how they have been used in history.

Elementary – Build, Listen and Learn

Interactive Resource: "The Insect Kite"
Interactive Resource: The Insect Kite
  • Make a Giant Insect Kite – This interactive resource gives step-by-step instructions on building a kite using the items many classrooms already have.
  • Days with Frog and Toad: The Kite – One of the “Frog and Toad” children’s stories written and illustrated by Arnold Lobel. In this story, Frog and his friend Toad spend the day together flying their kite and having lots of fun.
  • TeachEngineering: Will It Fly?– Your students can explore what makes a kite fly through this lesson plan. They will learn about the four forces that affect flight and variables involved in the engineering design of airplane models as they build their own balsa glider.

Middle – Physics and Electricity

PBS Teachers - Kite
Video: PBS Teachers – Kites
  • PBS Teachers: Kites – Danielle and Jasmin love to fly kites. Through this video, students will learn that kites come in all kinds of shapes and designs. They will enjoy watching Danielle and Jasmin prepare for a kite flying contest as they test a variety of kite styles to see how each will perform.

High – Math and History

Franklin's Electricity
Franklin’s Electricity
  • CK-12 Foundation: Geometry: Kites – Using geometry skills, students can explore why a kite is a quadrilateral, along with other properties of kites and how to apply them.
  • Engines of Our Ingenuity: Franklin’s Electricity – Some research puts Franklin’s electrical work in the scientific and political context of his day. An interesting point of view, one not usually found in comments of Franklin and electrostatics.

Find these resources and more in icurio with the keyword search: March Newsletter.

icurio 1.0 February Newsletter: Being President, Then and Now

Presidents’ Day Resources

The President of the United States has one of the most challenging jobs in the world. Has it always been that way? Did Washington and Lincoln experience difficult challenges during their time in office also?

There are many opportunities to use icurio’s resources to help your students understand the reasons why we honor Abraham Lincoln and George Washington on President’s Day each February. Students can also use icurio’s resources to learn important information about the Office of the President and the many duties of the men who have served in this role.

Elementary – Explore the Life of the President

Scholastic Magazine - What does the President Do?
Listen and Read: What Does the President Do?
  • Young Abraham Lincoln – Have your students discover what Abraham Lincoln’s early life was like in a resource from the National Park Service. Students learn about young Lincoln growing up, including how much he loved animals and the “blab school” that he attended.
  • What Does the President Do? – Do your students understand what the president does? Young students can listen and read as they learn what is involved in the job of the President of the United States. They can follow the president as he signs laws, meets with foreign leaders, and leads the armed forces.
  • Young George Washington’s Adventures -Students can experience the travels of 21-year-old George Washington as he delivers an important message to the French in 1753. Students choose the supplies and the people he takes on the journey, and travel with Washington as he encounters Native Americans, meets the French, and makes his dangerous journey home.

Middle – Historical Fiction, Interactive Timelines and Engaging Games

Discover George Washington
Discover George Washington
  • Historical Fiction: His First Dollar – This one-page historical fiction piece about Abraham Lincoln is a reading passage entitled “His First Dollar” and is used to develop comprehensive reading skills. The reading includes constructed-response questions that students should answer with text-based evidence.
  • Discover the Real George Washington – Encourage your students to discover the real George Washington by viewing this interactive timeline. Highlights include animated videos about his life, battle maps, and memories from his wife, Martha.
  • President for a Day – Do you or your students have what it takes to be president? With this fun interactive game, students can become president for a day and learn about the various daily activities of past presidents as they fill in their own day planner.

 

 

High – Bring the Presidents to Life with Primary Sources

A word fitly spoken
Interactive Timeline: A Word Fitly Spoken
  • A Word Fitly Spoken – Through the resource titled A Word Fitly Spoken, students experience an interactive timeline of Abraham Lincoln’s most famous speeches on the Union, including his First Inaugural Address, Second Inaugural Address, and Gettysburg Address.
  • A Letter from George Washington – Students will encounter an actual letter from George Washington in this Smithsonian resource. The letter reveals Washington’s active involvement in shaping the nation during the period after the Revolutionary War.
  • Abraham Lincoln’s Crossroads – Detailed information about Lincoln’s life and political career is included in this interactive game from the National Constitution Center. Students learn about decisions Lincoln had to make by playing the game titled Abraham Lincoln’s Crossroads.
  • Executive Office of the President – Students can explore the site of the Executive Office of the President, discover the links to the many departments and people that are part of this Office, and who serve to advise the president, to enact his directives, and to communicate his message to the American public.

Find these resources and more in icurio with the keyword search: February Newsletter.

February 2015: Celebrate Presidents’ Day with Your Students

Presidents’ Day Resources

President's Day - netTrekker

The President of the United States has one of the most challenging jobs in the world. Has it always been that way? Did Washington and Lincoln experience difficult challenges during their time in office also?

There are many opportunities to use netTrekker’s resources to help your students understand the reasons why we honor Abraham Lincoln and George Washington on President’s Day each February. Students can also use netTrekker’s resources to learn important information about the Office of the President and the many duties of the men who have served in this role.

Elementary – Explore the Life of the President


Scholastic Magazine - What does the President Do?
Listen and Read: What Does the President Do?
  • Young Abraham Lincoln – Have your students discover what Abraham Lincoln’s early life was like in a resource from the National Park Service. Students learn about young Lincoln growing up, including how much he loved animals and the “blab school” that he attended.
  • What Does the President Do? – Do your students understand what the president does? Young students can listen and read as they learn what is involved in the job of the President of the United States. They can follow the president as he signs laws, meets with foreign leaders, and leads the armed forces.
  • Young George Washington’s Adventures – Students can experience the travels of 21-year-old George Washington as he delivers an important message to the French in 1753. Students choose the supplies and the people he takes on the journey, and travel with Washington as he encounters Native Americans, meets the French, and makes his dangerous journey home.

Middle – Historical Fiction, Interactive Timelines and Engaging Games

Discover George Washington
Discover George Washington
  • Historical Fiction: His First Dollar – This one-page historical fiction piece about Abraham Lincoln is a reading passage entitled “His First Dollar” and is used to develop comprehensive reading skills. The reading includes constructed-response questions that students should answer with text-based evidence.
  • Discover George Washington – Encourage your students to discover the real George Washington by viewing this interactive timeline. Highlights include animated videos about his life, battle maps, and memories from his wife, Martha.
  • President for a Day – Do you or your students have what it takes to be president? With this fun interactive game, students can become president for a day and learn about the various daily activities of past presidents as they fill in their own day planner.

 

High – Bring the Presidents to Life with Primary Sources

A word fitly spokenInteractive Timeline: A Word Fitly Spoken
  • A Word Fitly Spoken – Through the resource titled A Word Fitly Spoken, students experience an interactive timeline of Abraham Lincoln’s most famous speeches on the Union, including his First Inaugural Address, Second Inaugural Address, and Gettysburg Address.
  • A letter from George Washington Students will encounter an actual letter from George Washington in this Smithsonian resource. The letter reveals Washington’s active involvement in shaping the nation during the period after the Revolutionary War.
  • Abraham Lincoln’s Crossroads – Detailed information about Lincoln’s life and political career is included in this interactive game from the National Constitution Center. Students learn about decisions Lincoln had to make by playing the game titled Abraham Lincoln’s Crossroads.
  • Executive Office of the President -Students can explore the site of the Executive Office of the President, discover the links to the many departments and people that are part of this Office, and who serve to advise the president, to enact his directives, and to communicate his message to the American public.

Find these resources and more in netTrekker with the keyword search: February Newsletter.